Tamoxifen bone pain

Discussion in 'Northwest Pharmacy Canada' started by vano1968, 11-Sep-2019.

  1. avto3232 Moderator

    Tamoxifen bone pain


    now I have started to get (keeping me awake )bone pain straight down front thigh.i am assuming that is tamoxifen and all the lovely joys it brings to the party!!! had an MRI for back issues last wed still waiting on results so could be from back.w Alking up stairs is particularly sore and as a mother of 3 you can imagine the stair trips. So should I just put up with it see if it passes,or ring hospital and see if the have results of MRI do I ring thought my breast nurse or oncology who ordered at a loss as to who I can ring now that I'm out. Thanks girls Xx Hi Wilma I am having more or less the same issue as you. Have been crippled with back pain since before Christmas . My GP sent a letter to my oncologist about it suggesting that a bone scan or MRI might be appropriate. I have been waiting weeks and have just been notified that I have an appointment to see him next Wed. I've been on tamoxifen for about a month now and have just started to notice that my bones ache. Not too many hot flashes yet, so I guess that's good:)It's just the rest of my body that feels like it's aged 20 years already! I have been on femara and was switched to tamoxifen. I'm curious about other people and what they're doing for it. I had knee surgery almost 2 years ago and my knee actually throbs at times. It keeps me up most of the night even when I take something to sleep. I'm n pain meds for chronic back pain and that's not even helping the achiness. I also have been on pain meds for chronic back pain. I just logged in to try to find some alternative to the pain meds or maybe a different one. Im not on tamoxifen anymore so i dont have anyting to add to that - but if you find yourself having bad hot flashes see if your onc is ok with you taking a 400iu vitamin E capsule daily - my onc recommended it to me for the hot flashes and to my surprise it is really working - they are becoming less frequent & not nearly as intense! She's going to look into the exact name though since she doesn't take it anymore. I told her to make sure you don't taste fish all day from it!! Also, not everyone has these side effects, so please don't feel like you are the only one. My doctor and I tried effexor, but I had side effects with that and couldn't continue. Jean This seems to be my only side effect from Tomoxifen and it's quite bad at times. Dana Dana, Mine just started yesterday and already I had enough. *hugs* heather I don't want anyone else to be in pain but I have to say I was relieved when I read this post! I told my hubby last night that I will give it a month, making it 2 months on, and if it doesn't get better I'm going to have to make a decision. I have been on Femara for 5 months and I am miserable. Everything hurts..I stand up from sitting I can hardly move. One year ago before diagnosis I worked out everyday and walked..I am scared to move because I don't want to hurt. Hey gang, I'm not on Tamoxifen yet but from all that I've read on it, bone and joint aches are common. Hugs, Lorrie Well, I spoke to my aunt last night; she is on her second go round with tamoxifen, she says that it does get better as our body adjusts to it. It's not even the pain, I can handle pain, it's the throbbing achy feeling that doesn't stop even for you to sleep that is getting to me. I have an appt with my Oncologist next week about the pain. I've also read that symptoms can go away in a few months once your body adapts to the new meds. I wonder if glucosamine will work to aid in relief? Angela I haven't had bone pain with it, but noticed some light chest pain and those terrible hot flashes that keep us up at night. I do not want to stop taking it because I don't want to repeat the last year. I am so sorry all of you are experiencing the same side effects. I am starting to think sleep is a thing of the past for me... I have read the other drugs that they use for breast cancer and they all sound worse.

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    Tamoxifen is the oldest of the hormonal therapies, drugs that block the effects of estrogen in the breast tissue. Tamoxifen is approved by the FDA to treat people diagnosed with both early-stage and advanced-stage hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. Learn more about tamoxifen in pill form. Bone pain tamoxifen - Forget about devastating health disorders with pharmaceuticals presented online impotence drugs, pain relievers, cancer drugs and other types of. Tamoxifen and anti-depressant use. Some types of anti-depressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors SSRIs can interfere with the metabolism of tamoxifen how tamoxifen works in the body. Whether these SSRIs may impact the effectiveness of tamoxifen is under study.

    Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) has been used for over 40 years to treat hormone-receptor positive early, locally advanced and metastatic breast cancers. Learn about tamoxifen and other hormone therapies for metastatic breast cancer. Hormone receptor-positive breast cancers need estrogen and/or progesterone (female hormones produced in the body) to grow. Tamoxifen attaches to the hormone receptor in the cancer cell, blocking estrogen from attaching to the receptor. This slows or stops the growth of the tumor by preventing the cancer cells from getting the hormones they need to grow. Tamoxifen is a pill taken every day for 5-10 years. For premenopausal women, tamoxifen may be combined with ovarian suppression. The benefits from tamoxifen last long after you stop taking it. Tamoxifen may cause cancer of the uterus (womb), strokes, and blood clots in the lungs. Tell your doctor if you have ever had a blood clot in the lungs or legs, a stroke, or a heart attack. Also tell your doctor if you smoke, if you have high blood pressure or diabetes, if your ability to move around during your waking hours is limited, or if you are taking anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin). If you experience any of the following symptoms during or after your treatment, call your doctor immediately: abnormal vaginal bleeding; irregular menstrual periods; changes in vaginal discharge, especially if the discharge becomes bloody, brown, or rusty; pain or pressure in the pelvis (the stomach area below the belly button); leg swelling or tenderness; chest pain; shortness of breath; coughing up blood; sudden weakness, tingling, or numbness in your face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of your body; sudden confusion; difficulty speaking or understanding; sudden difficulty seeing in one or both eyes; sudden difficulty walking; dizziness; loss of balance or coordination; or sudden severe headache. You will need to have gynecological examinations (examinations of the female organs) regularly to find early signs of cancer of the uterus. If you are thinking about taking tamoxifen to reduce the chance that you will develop breast cancer, you should talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of this treatment. You and your doctor will decide whether the possible benefit of tamoxifen treatment is worth the risks of taking the medication. If you need to take tamoxifen to treat breast cancer, the benefits of tamoxifen outweigh the risks. Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with tamoxifen and each time you refill your prescription.

    Tamoxifen bone pain

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  6. Helena67 wrote I was just wondering if anyone else has experienced bone pains with tamoxifen not aromatase inhibitors. I just started tamoxifen and developed an.

    • Breast Cancer Topic Tamoxifen and bone pain.
    • Tamoxifen for Breast Cancer Treatment - Side Effects..
    • Tamoxifen MedlinePlus Drug Information.

    Hi well taste is on a good run at mo thankfully!now I have started to get keeping me awake bone pain straight down front thigh.i am assuming that is tamoxifen and. TAMOXIFEN is a synthetic antiestrogen that, since its introduction for the treatment of patients with breast cancer in the early 1970s, has come to have a major role in the management of all. Joint pain from Tamoxifen; joint pain from Tamoxifen. Cancer Chat. as I have numerous bone prob I'm not sure I'd notice about bone pain as had pain for years.

     
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