Xanax reaction

By: Ranis Date of post: 26-Feb-2019
Alprazolam - Wikipedia

Alprazolam - Wikipedia

Common side effects of Xanax include dizziness, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache and slurred speech. This page lists Xanax side effects that are common, less common and rare, as well as withdrawal and overdose effects. If you or someone you love is taking Xanax or alprazolam (the generic version), you should be aware of the potential side effects, as well as the effects of overdose and discontinuation. Less Common or Rare: Gastrointestinal disturbances; blurred vision or other changes in vision; changes in sexual desire or ability; a headache; increased saliva; muscle spasm; problems urinating; trembling or shaking; unusual tiredness or weakness; weight changes. Rare: Abnormal thinking, disorientation, delusions or agitation; behavior changes, including aggressive behavior, bizarre behavior, decreased inhibition or outbursts of anger; convulsions (seizures); hallucinations ; hypotension (low blood pressure); muscle weakness; skin rash or itching; sore throat, fever and chills; ulcers or sores in mouth or throat; uncontrolled movements of body, including the eyes; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual excitement, nervousness or irritability; unusual tiredness or weakness (severe); yellow eyes or skin. Note: Xanax dependence may occur within a relatively short period of time, especially at higher dosages. There is a higher risk of withdrawal effects if the drug is stopped abruptly. Less common: Abdominal cramps, nausea or vomiting; fast or pounding heartbeat; increased physical sensitivities; increased sweating; delusions, hallucination, cognitive disturbances, muscle cramps or abnormal movements. Dimly, the California teacher remembered bending over the sink, trying to swallow water. According to the clock, that had been more than an hour ago. She fumbled for her phone but couldn't think clearly enough to text for help."I felt these horrible jolts running through my head and body; I couldn't stop jerking," she recalled. "Then I began seeing stuff that wasn't there, creepy-crawly things. I didn't know what was happening, but I worried I might be dying."The previous morning Jenna, then 33, had inexplicably woken up shaking."I'm usually pretty confident and outgoing, but I felt like I couldn't leave my apartment," she said. My boss noticed the shaking and was concerned; I told him I wasn't sure what it was and I went home early."There, things got worse. Her twitching intensified, and she grew increasingly confused.

The homie gone off the <b>xanax</b> - YouTube

The homie gone off the xanax - YouTube

Alprazolam, more commonly known by its brand name, Xanax, is a medication indicated to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Xanax is in a class of medications known as benzodiazepines. Xanax helps to calm the nerves and induces a feeling of relaxation. In high doses, however, it has the potential to be abused and can lead to dependence (addiction). For this reason, it’s classified as a federal controlled substance (C-IV). If you’re new to taking Xanax, you may be wondering how long the effects will last in your body, factors that might influence how long Xanax stays in your system, and what to do if you decide to stop taking it. Xanax is taken by mouth and is readily absorbed into the bloodstream. You should start feeling the effects of Xanax in under an hour. Xanax is the brand name of a drug called alprazolam, which is prescribed for the treatment of a range of panic and anxiety disorders. This drug acts a chemical enhancer in the brain to slow down excessive brain activity and reduce feelings of stress and panic. Xanax is extremely effective, but can be dangerous if used outside of the prescribed dosage. If you or someone you know is taking this medication under a doctor’s supervision, understanding how Xanax works is important in anticipating how it will affect the brain and body — and in steering clear of a Xanax addiction. Xanax is a prescription drug meant to treat anxiety and panic disorders. Its generic form, alprazolam, is the most prescribed psychiatric drug in the United States because of its potency and its ability to work so quickly. Xanax — along with Seeking addiction treatment can feel overwhelming.

<i>Xanax</i> Warnings, uses, and side effects -
Xanax Warnings, uses, and side effects -

Xanax is a drug that is used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. It promotes a feeling of calm and relaxation, and when taken correctly, is a safe and effective drug. Xanax may be trendy, but it can affect your health. She'd become concerned about her reaction to the drug. "Between doses, it felt like my.

Xanax reaction
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